National Immunisation Program Schedule (From 20 April 2015)

Page last updated: 25 November 2016

PDF printable version of the National Immunisation Program Schedule (PDF 113 KB)

Child programs
Age Vaccine
Birth
  • Hepatitis B (hepB)a
2 months
  • Hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type b, inactivated poliomyelitis (polio) (hepB-DTPa-Hib-IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (13vPCV)
  • Rotavirus
4 months
  • Hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type b, inactivated poliomyelitis (polio) (hepB-DTPa-Hib-IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (13vPCV)
  • Rotavirus
6 months
  • Hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type b, inactivated poliomyelitis (polio) (hepB-DTPa-Hib-IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (13vPCV)
  • Rotavirus b
12 months
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b and meningococcal C (Hib-MenC)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
18 months
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox) (MMRV)
4 years
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) and inactivated poliomyelitis (polio) (DTPa-IPV)
School programs
Age Vaccine
10–15 years (contact your State or Territory Health Department for details)
  • Varicella (chickenpox) c
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) d
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (whooping cough) (dTpa)
At-risk groups Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
Age Vaccine
12–18 months (In high risk areas) e
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (13vPCV)
12–24 months (In high risk areas) f
  • Hepatitis A
6 months to less than 5 years
  • Influenza (flu)
15 years and over
  • Influenza (flu)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV) (medically at risk)
50 years and over
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV)
Other at-risk groups
Age Vaccine
6 months and over (people with medical conditions placing them at risk of serious complications of influenza)
  • Influenza (flu)
12 months (medically at risk) e
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (13vPCV)
4 years (medically at risk)e
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV)
Pregnant women (at any stage of pregnancy)
  • Influenza (flu)
65 years and over
  • Influenza (flu)
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (23vPPV)
70 years (a free single catch-up dose is available for adults aged 71-79 years until 31 October 2021)
  • Herpes Zoster (Shingles)

Footnotes to the National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule

  1. Hepatitis B: vaccine should be given to all infants as soon as practicable after birth. The greatest benefit is if given within 24 hours, and must be given within 7 days
  2. Rotavirus vaccine: third dose of vaccine is dependent on vaccine brand used. Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.
  3. Varicella vaccine: contact your State or Territory Health Department for details on the school grade eligible for vaccination.
  4. HPV vaccine: is for all adolescents aged between 12 and 13 years. Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details on the school grade eligible for vaccination.
  5. Pneumococcal vaccine:
    1. Medically at risk children require a fourth dose of 13vPCV at 12 months of age and a booster dose of 23vPPV at 4 years of age.
    2. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children require a fourth dose of pneumococcal vaccine (13vPCV) at 12-18 months of age for children living in high risk areas (Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia). Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.
  6. Hepatitis A vaccine: two doses of Hepatitis A vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in high risk areas (Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia). Contact your State or Territory Health Department for details.